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dc.contributor.authorAlves, Guillermo
dc.contributor.authorVarvasino, Joaquín
dc.coverage.spatialAmérica Latina y el Caribees_ES
dc.date.accessioned2022-12-14T19:41:17Z
dc.date.available2022-12-14T19:41:17Z
dc.date.issued2022-12-13
dc.identifier.citationAlves, G., & Varvasino, J. (2022, December 13). Lasting Scars: The Unequal Impacts of Unemployment in Latin America. Retrieved from https://cafscioteca.azurewebsites.net/handle/123456789/1987en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttps://cafscioteca.azurewebsites.net/handle/123456789/1987
dc.description.tableofcontentsWe study the impact of the unemployment rate at the time of labor market entrance on the labor outcomes of individuals of different social origin in 18 Latin American countries. Higher unemployment increases the probability of being unemployed, decreases the likelihood of being a firm owner, and increases the chances of being a self-employed farmer. These effects persist even ten years after the start of the labor career and differ depending on the social origin of individuals. The effects on the chances of being unemployed are only observed for individuals of lower social origin. Higher unemployment rates at the beginning of their careers also make these individuals much less likely to have their own business compared to those of higher social origin. In contrast, the effect of early unemployment rates on the increased likelihood of being a farmer is more pronounced among individuals of high social origin.es_ES
dc.language.isoen_USes_ES
dc.subjectDesempleoes_ES
dc.subjectInvestigación socioeconómicaes_ES
dc.titleLasting Scars: The Unequal Impacts of Unemployment in Latin Americaes_ES
dc.typeworkingPaperes_ES


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