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dc.contributor.authorAgüero, Jorge M.
dc.coverage.spatialAmérica Latina y el Caribees_ES
dc.coverage.spatialColombiaes_ES
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-04T14:18:28Z
dc.date.available2021-06-04T14:18:28Z
dc.date.issued2021-04-20
dc.identifier.urihttp://scioteca.caf.com/handle/123456789/1727
dc.description.tableofcontentsPolicy makers and international organizations often argue that teenage pregnancy affects girls’ life trajectories by, for example, limiting their employment opportunities. These concerns are amplified in regions with high teen pregnancy rates such as Latin America. We use a unique dataset from Colombia that allows us to instrument for early motherhood with the age at menarche. We find that teen pregnancy reduces school attainment and increases the number of children ever born. However, when considering eight indicators of labor supply, including labor force participation, type of job and occupation while accounting for multiple hypothesis testing, we find that much (if not all) of the negative effects on labor supply attributed to teen motherhood are due to selection. Our findings weaken the claim that early motherhood leads to a path of low-quality employment or a misallocation of talent due to job sorting. We discuss the role that family network and co-residence plays as a mechanism to buffer the effects of early motherhood on labor supply.es_ES
dc.language.isoenes_ES
dc.publisherCAFes_ES
dc.subjectCuidado infantiles_ES
dc.subjectEducaciónes_ES
dc.subjectEstudianteses_ES
dc.subjectFamiliaes_ES
dc.subjectInvestigación socioeconómicaes_ES
dc.subjectJóveneses_ES
dc.subjectMujeres_ES
dc.subjectNiñezes_ES
dc.subjectPolíticas públicases_ES
dc.titleMisallocated Talent: Teen Pregnancy, Education and Job Sorting in Colombiaes_ES
dc.typeOtheres_ES
dc.publisher.cityCaracases_ES


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